Sinus & Allergy Testing

Allergy Doctor in Spartanburg & Greer, SC

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Skin Testing

During an allergy skin test, your skin is exposed to allergy-causing substances (allergens) and then is observed for signs of a local allergic reaction.

Along with your medical history, allergy tests can confirm whether signs and symptoms, such as sneezing, wheezing and skin rashes, are caused by allergies. Allergy tests can also identify the specific substances that trigger allergic reactions. Information from allergy tests can help your doctor develop an allergy treatment plan that may include allergen avoidance, medications or allergy shots (immunotherapy).

A small amount of a suspected allergen is placed on or below the skin to see if a reaction develops. There are two types of skin tests:

Skin Prick Test
This test is done by placing a drop of a solution containing a possible allergen on the skin, and a series of scratches or needle pricks allows the solution to enter the skin. If the skin develops a red, raised itchy area (called a wheal), it usually means that the person is allergic to that allergen. This is called a positive reaction.

Intradermal Test
During this test, a small amount of the allergen solution is injected into the skin. An intradermal allergy test may be done when a substance does not cause a reaction in the skin prick test but is still suspected as an allergen for that person. The intradermal test is more sensitive than the skin prick test but is more often positive in people who do not have symptoms to that allergen (false-positive test results).

Skin Testing Resources:


Blood Testing

Allergy blood tests look for substances in the blood called antibodies. Blood tests are not as sensitive as skin tests but are often used for people who are not able to have skin tests.

The most common type of blood test used is the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, EIA). It measures the blood level of a type of antibody (called immunoglobulin E, or IgE) that the body may make in response to certain allergens. IgE levels are often higher in people who have allergies or asthma.

Other lab testing methods, such as radioallergosorbent testing (RAST) or an immunoassay capture test (ImmunoCAP, UniCAP, or Pharmacia CAP), may be used to provide more information.

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Office Hours
Monday:09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Tuesday:09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Wednesday:09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Thursday:09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Friday:09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Saturday:Closed
Sunday:Closed